Class 3-5

Almost a thousand years ago, an Indian scholar called Hemachandra discovered a fascinating number sequence. A century later, the same sequence caught the attention of Italian mathematician Fibonacci, who wrote about it. The Fibonacci sequence, as it began to be called, was straightforward enough - what made it fascinating was that this particular set of numbers was repeated many, many times in nature - in flowers, seashells, eggs, seeds, stars... Find out more inside this book!

 

Chemistry is everywhere – right from the food that students eat to the toys that they play with. If approached the right way, teachers can build on the natural curiosity of children and make chemistry a subject that they will enjoy learning.

Chemistry is everywhere – right from the food that students eat to the toys that they play with. If approached the right way, teachers can build on the natural curiosity of children and make chemistry a subject that they will enjoy learning.

Intelligence was a term usually used to describe individuals. Simply put, it stood for the ability of the individual to acquire and apply knowledge and skills. There are many ways to determine how intelligent a person is. But intellectual capacities of two or more individuals can work together or collaborate in order to produce, perhaps, more effective outcomes. One can term it as collective intelligence.

Use this board game to reinforce your learners' understanding on food webs & food chains.

Kamla Bhasin's haunting reminders on gender stereotyping are as relevant as ever. Here is the 1st one. You may use it as a 'seed idea' & explore discussions & debate with your learners. You may ask them to build a skit or paint a picture on the same theme.

Dear Teacher,

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English

Math is full of symbols: lines, dots, arrows, English letters, Greek letters, superscripts, subscripts ... it can look like an illegible jumble. Where did all of these symbols come from? John David Walters shares the origins of mathematical symbols, and illuminates why they’re still so important in the field today.

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