Mathematics

Math is full of symbols: lines, dots, arrows, English letters, Greek letters, superscripts, subscripts ... it can look like an illegible jumble. Where did all of these symbols come from? John David Walters shares the origins of mathematical symbols, and illuminates why they’re still so important in the field today.

This worksheet makes the kids play with numbers and appreciate how these numbers (1-9) can be represented in different ways. Please add your feedback, especially after using it in your classroom.

Exploding dots

By GopiKrishnaTest | Aug 30, 2019

I teach math concepts ( curriculum and non-curriculum ) at home to my son ( grade 3) .
I am exploring 'exploding dots' , this topic seems to takes good amount of time, so want to make sure it is worth to learn.

Is it worth to learn 'exploding dots' ? Please share your experience.

Note: Gone through James Tanton videos , practiced some by myself.

Number tricks are fun to perform and are an excellent way to enhance mathematical skills. When I was young, we used to discuss a lot of number tricks. One amongst those was as follows:

Take a number with a lot of digits. For example, suppose you think of 2134567. Add its digits: 2 + 1 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 = 28. Subtract 28 from the original number taken, 2134567. You’ll get some answer, say abcdefg.

How does one introduce a topic like ratio, which is so widely present in daily life and so intimately connected with human experiences? Our cherished cultural achievements are permeated with it: music is full of ratios, as is art. Our daily existence involves cooking and shopping, and these are filled through and through with the usage of ratio. Shadows, which are present with us all through the day, offer a visual depiction of ratios in action.

We live in an era of data and information. Right from deciding what to read, what to wear, which restaurant to go to, which city to visit, whom to vote for, we consider ourselves rational human beings who rely on data to make all our decisions. How much of this data is based on facts rather than opinions and/or perceptions? This review looks at two websites, Gapminder and Our World in Data, which attempt to provide reliable global statistics and promote a fact-based worldview.

The following geometry problem is simple to state but challenging to solve!

In this edition of ‘Adventures’ we study a few miscellaneous problems.

Interesting problem on area and triangle.

A question about angle bisectors Consider a △ABC in which D, E and F are the midpoints of the sides BC, CA and AB respectively. Let G be the centroid of triangle ABC, i.e., the point of intersection of the medians AD, BE and CF. It is well-known that G is also the centroid of triangle DEF. If, instead of being the midpoints, the points D, E and F are the points of intersection of the internal bisectors of

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