perception

 Indu Prasad

The social sciences are fields of academic scholarship which explore aspects of human society and complex human relationships. Social science perspectives and knowledge are indispensable to building the knowledge base for a just and peaceful society. The social sciences encompass diverse concerns of society, and include a wide range of content drawn from the disciplines of history, geography, political science, economics, sociology and anthropology.

Art instructors are used to the question, sometimes benign, sometimes inquisitive, sometimes disparaging, sometimes hostile, from myriad sources including parents, teachers, administrators, and certainly students, “What is the point of learning art?” This question of course rides on the shoulder of many other unstated underlying questions such as “Is not art a luxury or a middle class pursuit?” “Can we not leave art to those genuinely interested or talented in art?” “How is art practically useful?” “Is not art redundant in the age of digitalized production and

Art instructors are used to the question, sometimes benign, sometimes inquisitive, sometimes disparaging, sometimes hostile, from myriad sources including parents, teachers, administrators, and certainly students, “What is the point of learning art?” This question of course rides on the shoulder of many other unstated underlying questions such as “Is not art a luxury or a middle class pursuit?” “Can we not leave art to those genuinely interested or talented in art?” “How is art practically useful?” “Is not art redundant in the age of digitalized production and

We live in an era of data and information. Right from deciding what to read, what to wear, which restaurant to go to, which city to visit, whom to vote for, we consider ourselves rational human beings who rely on data to make all our decisions. How much of this data is based on facts rather than opinions and/or perceptions? This review looks at two websites, Gapminder and Our World in Data, which attempt to provide reliable global statistics and promote a fact-based worldview.

In our November column we introduced the concept of ambigrams—the art of writing words in surprisingly symmetrical ways. In this column, we use ambigrams to demonstrate (and play with) mathematical ideas relating to symmetry and invariance.

In this article, by Punya Mishra and Gaurav Bhatnagar, we are going to focus on a very specific kind of artistic wordplay (and its relationship to mathematics) - Ambigrams.

The writer suggests some of the ideas that she has tried in the classroom and has found to be successful in terms of enriching the quality of her students' compositions and their interest and enthusiasm for writing itself. 

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