CC BY-NC-SA

I write this article asking a few questions and giving some possible answers.
 
Why do I teach art?
I teach art because light, colour, form, texture, lines and strokes have such an enduring impact on me that I want to share my joy and experiences with the children.
 
Why should a child do art?
World over education policies almost always recognise the value of co-scholastic areas, such as arts and sports, in providing quality education to students. But what constitutes good education and a quality learning environment? One view focuses on the marks achieved in the core subjects and other immediately measurable outcomes. The other view is the ‘ability’ of the school to create a good educational experience.
The concept of using everyday materials in creating artefacts has a strong impact on education.
 
Notes on the Sky Self
If we move beyond the limited worlds of assessment, employment and success, we will be ready to create art programmes that revolutionise the identity of each child.
 
Art to a layman means the picture he sees in the magazine or poster or canvas. That is not true. That is only the image, Art is much more.
What is Art ?
It is a holistic visual experience involving a multi – sensory dimension. If for understanding we break it up into the various senses involved then we are talking of:
a) the visual experience via the eyes
Notes on the Sky Self
If we move beyond the limited worlds of assessment, employment and success, we will be ready to create art programmes that revolutionise the identity of each child.
 
Imaginative thinking may not be considered a skill, but it is more basic than most art skills. It is very difficult to teach in junior classes. They have their own fantasies in the art world. Entering this world is not an easy task. At the beginning of their art learning, some teacher may have asked them to draw some shape or fill up this shape with colour or to draw straight lines. Sometimes, they find this very boring and become less interested in their art classes.

Celebrating the joy of being alive, a calf executes a series of sudden exuberant leaps, its limbs trembling with life force. A sudden sunburst after a sharp shower lights up a washed and scented earth. The blue flash of a kingfisher’s wing; the sharp tut tut of a startled squirrel darting away with fluffed tail upraised; sal flowers floating down like a soft blessing; the sweet scent of far away jasmine carried on the cool night breeze; morning dew, grey on the green grass; the laughter of children out in the rain.

We have typically slotted all the arts taught in schools as “extra-curricular’. The connotation is that it is an addition to a curriculum, something that lies on the fringes - just outside the purview of all that is sacred! And what we really mean, without mincing words, is that it is non- academic. It does not end with that all-absolving Board Examination! So it is all right to accord it the space in the timetable when the children are tired – late afternoon – some dance, music and ne art before they pack their bags and dash for their waiting buses!

Art instructors are used to the question, sometimes benign, sometimes inquisitive, sometimes disparaging, sometimes hostile, from myriad sources including parents, teachers, administrators, and certainly students, “What is the point of learning art?” This question of course rides on the shoulder of many other unstated underlying questions such as “Is not art a luxury or a middle class pursuit?” “Can we not leave art to those genuinely interested or talented in art?” “How is art practically useful?” “Is not art redundant in the age of digitalized production and

Pages

17934 registered users
6760 resources