Class II goes to polls!

Resource Info

Basic Information

Political science is a subject often voted as ‘too dull’ or ‘too boring’ by students. They move through Political science lessons rather mechanically and monotonously, using the rote method and rarely realizing its significance and relevance to their lives. Children notice and observe bits and pieces of ‘politics’ and ‘government’ around them but fail to associate them with the matter in their text books. Having an early start to help children practically experience the relevance of political science in their life before they move on to its theory is an excellent way to introduce the subject. This module discusses a mock election process, where children will learn the concepts of ‘campaigning’, ‘secret ballot’, ‘invalid vote’, ‘counting’ etc.

Duration: 
01 hours 20 mins
Introduction: 

Political science is a subject often voted as ‘too dull’ or ‘too boring’ by students. They move through Political science lessons rather mechanically and monotonously, using the rote method and rarely realizing its significance and relevance to their lives. Children notice and observe bits and pieces of ‘politics’ and ‘government’ around them but fail to associate them with the matter in their text books. Having an early start to help children practically experience the relevance of political science in their life before they move on to its theory is an excellent way to introduce the subject. This module discusses a mock election process, where children will learn the concepts of ‘campaigning’, ‘secret ballot’, ‘invalid vote’, ‘counting’ etc.

Objective: 
  1. To help the students gain a hands-on experience of the election process.
  2.  To familiarize the students with electoral terms such as campaign, ballot, vote etc.
  3.  To teach the students the method and rules of the election process.

 

Activity Steps: 

Session 1:

Support Material

Pictures of different party symbols, an empty box to serve as the ballot box, paper sheets to make ballot papers.

Steps

Step 1: Generating Interest

1. Have the students bring in pictures of different political party symbols.

2. Let the students paste the pictures in their scrap books and write the names of the respective parties with the pictures. Help them associate the symbols with the parties they stand for.

Step 2: Group discussion

1. Initiate a discussion on the voting process, rules and regulations like the minimum age required for voting, the concept of a ballot etc.  

At what age are you allowed to vote?

How many votes does an individual have?

Why do they put the mark on the finger?

Why do they use indelible ink?

Step 3: Initiating the election process

1. Divide the class into 3 groups. Ask each group to nominate a party head.

2. Now each group or party has to decide a name for the party, design a party symbol, and prepare an election agenda.

3. Introduce the concept of campaigning in an election process, and ask the party leaders to address the class and tell them what they would do for the class if they were elected captain and why the class had to vote for them.

 

Session 2:

Steps

Step 1: Casting the vote

1. Cut the paper sheets into equal sized paper slips. Hand each student a paper slip to prepare the ballot papers and ask each student to draw the three party symbols, one below the other on the paper.

2. Now collect the ballot slips and shuffle them.

3. Ask each child to come up to the ballot box individually. Hand over the ballot paper and ask the student to make a mark against the party symbol they want to vote for, fold the slip and put it into the box. Explain how overwriting or crossing over will make the vote ‘invalid’ and that it will not be counted.

4.Strike off the names from the voting register as each child votes. Use a marker to make a mark on the voter’s finger.

Step 2: Counting

1. Call up three students one from each group.

2. Assign one student the responsibility of opening the ballot box and removing the slips, the second to call out the name of the party voted, and the third student to write the number of votes against each party on the black board.

3.Now let the students tally the figures and decide who their captain and vice-captain is. They now have their democratically elected leaders!

 

 

13913 registered users
5837 resources